Rothschild Miscellany

MS. 180/51

Israel Museum, Jerusalem
ISBN 978-0-948223-03-7

£8,210

Only 2 left in stock (can be backordered)

The Rothschild Miscellany was commissioned by Moses ben Yekuthiel Hakohen in 1479 when the Jews in Italy prospered and adopted the ways of the aristocracy. It was a time when the Jews in Italy came into contact with all sectors of society and many adopted the way of life of the gentile aristocracy. They enjoyed the favourable attitude of some of the great Italian Princes such as the Medici of Florence and the Este of Ferrara. The prohibition by the Church for Christians to lend money for interest was beneficial to the Jewish community, many of whom prospered. The wealthy Jew became a man of the Renaissance who took pleasure in affluent living with a taste for letters and art. This was a period of unprecedented cultural activity amongst Italian Jewry, producing scholars, artists, poets and physicians. Nonetheless, the Jews never became estranged from their Jewish intellectual and religious heritage.

From its inception the manuscript was planned as a sumptuous work to encompass almost every custom of religious and secular Jewish life mirroring Italian Renaissance miniatures. This richness of content has long led it to be considered as the most elegant and lavish of all Hebrew manuscripts. The Miscellany, probably made in a workshop in the Ferrara region echoes the style of the best artists who worked for the court of the Este and who may have been connected with the same artists who illuminated the famous Latin Bible of Borso d’Este.

Folios 147a-146b - This scene was possibly painted by Bonifacio Bembo. The Hosha’not prayers recited during Sukkot (the Feast of Tabernacles). Two children are playfully jousting and riding deer in a garden of flowers. On the left, a man has a myrtle, palm branch (lulav) and citron (etrog). On the opposite, beautifully illuminated page, the text is part of the Amidah recited on Yom Kippur. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

The complete history of the Miscellany is somewhat of a mystery. From 1832 to 1855 the manuscript was in the Solomon de Parente collection in Trieste. It was later sold to the Rothschild family in Paris and remained there until it was stolen during the Nazi occupation. In May 1950, the Berlin bookseller Hugo Streisand, offered it for US$5,000 to the Jewish Theological Seminary. Alexander Marx, the Seminary’s librarian, recognised it as stolen from the Rothschilds and returned it to them in London. James de Rothschild was persuaded by Mordechai Narkiss that a manuscript of such importance was a national treasure and therefore belonged in Israel. In 1957, on hearing of Narkiss’ illness, James de Rothschild sent it as a gift to Jerusalem.  The Scenes in the image below depict the Passover Seder.

Folio 156a-155b -The beginning of the Haggadah depicting the search for leaven, making matzot and the kiddush. The marginal text contains Maimonides' Passover laws. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>
Scenes depicting preparation for Passover and kiddush at the beginning of the Haggadah section ... more

These pages contain scenes from the Haggadah section which is probably the most beautifully illustrated of all Haggadot. Other pages depict the seder. Folio 156v, “Let all who are hungry come and eat; let all who are needy come and celebrate Passover with us.” … illustrates the blessing of the karpas (green herb, probably celery), eaten as an appetizer; with an affectionate gesture the master of the house offers it to his wife. The traditional large seder plate is on the table and it contains the food to be consumed during the Passover meal – three matzoth piled one on the other, a lettuce heart, bitter herbs (maror), and a leg of lamb, symbolizing the Paschal lamb. Alongside, in the second scene, there are two successive moments in the ritual – the breaking of the matzah, half of which is held by the master of the house and the removal of the seder plate from the table before the maggid (“Recite the Haggadah”) section.

On folio 157 a child asks the four questions that are essential to the reading of the Haggadah. “Why is this night different from all other nights…”

Following the instructions in the line above the illustration, another cup of wine is poured and we see a youth making this very gesture. At the moment that the answer to the four questions, “We were once slaves…,” is recited, the plate is brought back to the table by the youth as the ritual requires.

While comparable scenes may be found in Sephardi, Ashkenazi and Italian manuscripts, the unusual aspect here is the presence of the whole sequence. Many details here are unique interpretations.

 

 

Folio 165a-164b - Piyyutim for Passover. The four miniatures depict Abraham entertaining the angels, Gabriel hurling fiery rocks over Sodom, Sisera defeated by Debora and Barak and Daniel and the lion. The marginal texts contain Maimonides laws concerning Passover. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

These scenes depict piyyutim for Passover at the  end of the Haggadah section.

This large collection of miscellaneous yet connected texts became the framework for an unprecedented programme of illumination. Of 948 pages, 816 are decorated in minute detail in vibrant colours, gold and silver. No other Hebrew manuscript equals the richness and scope of the illumination of this Miscellany.

The Facsimile

“Michael and Linda Falter of Facsimile Editions produced what is unequivocally the finest facsimile ever created of a Hebrew manuscript of the Italian Renaissance period.”  Sotheby’s New York 

Read more

Linda Falter and the Italian 'team' comparing the unbound Rothschild Miscellany manuscript with second proofs at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

The Rothschild Miscellany at The Israel Museum, proved to be an even greater challenge than the Kennicott Bible, for the publishers’ philosophy dictates that a facsimile must be as close to the original in every possible aspect. Tremendous efforts were made to acquire the finest materials and craftsmen to impart to each volume not only the presence but also the feel of an original manuscript.

In order to reproduce the Rothschild Miscellany in the same uncompromising way, a great deal of research and further technical development was required for the manuscript is lavishly decorated on almost every page. The Falters moved to Italy to supervise every stage of the facsimile’s production and by combining craftsmanship and dogged determination with modern technology, remarkable results have been achieved.

Folio 312a-311b - Meshal Haqadmoni, 'Image of both the wolf and the fox, and the bear passes before them' at right. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

Photography

Photographing the manuscript is the first stage in the production of the facsimile. In order to capture the fine detail, David Harris, photographed the manuscript at the Israel museum in Jerusalem on Ektachrome film using a large-format camera. To completely eliminate any curvature close to the spine, the manuscript was disbound so that its folios could be photographed flat.

Colour Separation, Proofing and Printing

The printing of the exquisite miniatures in twelve colours demanded skill and perseverance by Italian master-printers. Colour separations made from each of the manuscript’s 948 pages were used to make ‘wet’ proofs printed on the same paper as the facsimile. They were individually checked for colour fidelity against the manuscript in Jerusalem and then re-proofed in Italy (up to four times for each page) until the colour-match was exactly right.

Paper

The original manuscript’s folios were measured for thickness, weight and opacity and a new type of ‘paper’ virtually indistinguishable from the manuscript’s vellum, was specially milled in Italy. The result is a fine, neutral pH vegetable parchment with the same natural characteristics of skin that makes printing on it very difficult indeed. The Miscellany’ pages edges are brown with age and irregular, so, in the facsimile each one has been laboriously cut to exactly the same size and shape as the original and then “aged”.

Folio 347b -From Meshal Haqadmoni, “Image of the man who looks and of what he sees” <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

Gold

No printing process can adequately simulate a manuscript’s gold leaf. Craftsmen applied the gold and silver metal by hand to 812 pages using a special building-up process to give the same raised effect as in the original, without embossing. This facsimile is the first to reproduce raised burnished gold accurately. In addition, the manuscript contains thousands of illustrations decorated with powdered and flat gold and silver. This too has been faithfully reproduced in the facsimile.

Holes

The scribe would have purchased the very best vellum available, but occasionally a skin would have a hole in it and, as the cost of vellum was high, the scribe could not afford to discard it. The holes in the facsimile were cut in exactly the same positions as the holes in the manuscript. Where holes appeared in the middle of a page the printing had to be positioned with perfect relative precision so that when the hole was cut, the text was not damaged.

Pricking and Bookworm

The pages of the manuscript contain the minute pricking marks made by the scribe between which he ruled parallel lines to guide him in the writing of the text. They were often trimmed off before binding but in the Rothschild Miscellany some pricking is still evident on many of the pages. This is the first time that pricking holes have ever been copied in a facsimile; their reproduction demanding a level of precision and accuracy previously unheard of in facsimile production. Similarly, the bookworm that attacked some of the pages over the ages has also been accurately reproduced.

The binding in morocco goatskin with sterling silver clasps. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

Binding

As the manuscript’s original binding no longer exists, Mirjam Foot, formerly Director of Collections and Preservation at The British Library, London, suggested an exquisite Italian binding of the period, worthy of the manuscript, that has been copied in minute detail. The facsimile is bound in fine-grain morocco goatskin, blind-tooled on the front and back covers with morocco head and tail bands. The binding is secured by four silver clasps on morocco thongs; the thongs and clasps are attached to the binding by minute silver nails.

View of the spine <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>
Folio 139b - Confessing sins on the Day of Atonement<small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">  © Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

Numbering

Each facsimile volume’s unique number is permanently blind-stamped by hand into the binding using small metal dies. All the printing plates were destroyed, with rabbinic consent, so that no subsequent copies could be printed thus ensuring the uniqueness and value of the edition.

Presentation

The facsimile is presented in a cloth-bound hinged slipcase edged in morocco together with a similar slipcase for the commentary volume. Every set is accompanied by a certificate bearing the seals and signatures of both The Israel Museum and Facsimile Editions.

Personalised Dedication

Whether the facsimile is intended as a gift to an institution or a private individual, our calligrapher can inscribe an illuminated dedication in any language at no extra cost.

Folios 80a/79b  - The beginning of the prayer book starts with Ma tovu, “How goodly are thy tents, O Jacob” and depicts a man walking to the synagogue. On the right, the prayer, Adon Olam, “The Lord of all”. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

Commentary Volume

Five eminent scholars contributed to the commentary volume which describes the rich subject matter of the illustrations, the stylistic affinity and differences between the artists and their relation to general Italian illumination of the period, the historical and social background of the manuscript, the codicology, palaeography, religious and liturgical content of the Miscellany, and the binding. The commentary, illustrated in colour, is printed on Magnani mould-made paper with deckle edges in a separate volume and bound in blind-tooled morocco to complement the facsimile. The two volumes are presented in cloth-covered slip-cases, edged in goatskin.

Commentary Volume page 144/145  <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

Contents

Introduction

Iris Fishof (editor), formerly Chief Curator of Judaica and Jewish Ethnography, Israel Museum

Historical Background of the Manuscript

Shlomo Simonsohn, Professor of Jewish History, Tel-Aviv Unversity

The Literary Content of the Manuscript

Israel Ta-Shema, Professor of Talmud, Hebrew University, Jerusalem

A Palaeographical and Codicological Study of the Manuscript

Malachi Beit-Arié, Professor of Codicology and Palaeography, Hebrew University, former Director of the Jewish National and University Library, Jerusalem

The Facsimile’s Binding

Mirjam Foot, formerly Assistant Keeper in charge of Historical Bindings, British Library, London

The Illumination and the Artists

Louisella Mortara-Ottolenghi, Professor of Codicology and History of Illumination, Universita degli Studi di Milano

Additional Scholarship

Binjamin Elizur, Professor Raphael Loewe

The introduction deals with the physical description of the manuscript, and tells the story of its creation and programme. The illustrations were studied for their style and origin and the unique artistry of Joseph Ibn Hayyim is discussed in a special chapter interpreting his relations to both the older and contemporary art of Spain.

A fascinating story is told in a popular manner, with the thorough knowledge of experts augmenting the understanding of the Kennicott Bible for laymen and scholars alike.

The Commentary Volume contains many additional illustrations of comparative material and is produced as a separate volume the same size as the facsimile. It is bound in the finest morocco to complement the Miscellany. The two volumes are cased in a presentation portfolio box.

Specification

Folio 246b - The beginning of the hymns sung at marriages. The page depicts three young couples dancing. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

Codicology

• Israel Museum MS.180/51
• ISBN 0 948223 030
• Size 21cm x 15.6cm x 10.2cm (8¼” x 6 1/8″ x 4″) approximately (page sizes vary slightly)
• 948 Pages, 474 folios numbered 0-473
• 816 illuminated pages with raised burnished gold, flat gold, powdered gold, silver and brilliant delicate colours

Paper

• 160gsm, uncoated, neutral pH paper
• A paper mill in Italy took more than a year to make the 5 tons of paper to accurately reproduce the opacity, texture and thickness of the manuscript’s vellum, widely acclaimed as the closest likeness to vellum ever achieved. The paper was developed exclusively for this facsimile.

Colour Separation & Proofing

• Colour separations and wet proofs were printed on the same paper used in the facsimile and compared with the original manuscript in Jerusalem by Linda Falter and the team. Every gold dot was checked against the original. The proofs were marked up for correction and sent back to Italy for further proofs to be made. Up to four sets of proofs were made for each page.

Printing

• Offset lithography in up to twelve colours. It took four months to print the facsimile. During this entire time, Linda Falter was at the press ensuring, before allowing printing to proceed, that the colour reproduction of every page perfectly matched the proofs and that no hickeys or marks had crept onto the plates.

Folio 79b - The beginning of the prayer book begins with Ma tovu. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>
Folio 79b - The beginning of the prayer book begins with Ma tovu. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/"> © Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

Paper

• 160gsm, uncoated, neutral pH paper
• A paper mill in Italy took more than a year to make the 5 tons of paper to accurately reproduce the opacity, texture and thickness of the manuscript’s vellum, widely acclaimed as the closest likeness to vellum ever achieved. The paper was developed exclusively for this facsimile.

Colour Separation & Proofing

• Colour separations and wet proofs were printed on the same paper used in the facsimile and compared with the original manuscript in Jerusalem by Linda Falter and the team. Every gold dot was checked against the original. The proofs were marked up for correction and sent back to Italy for further proofs to be made. Up to four sets of proofs were made for each page.

Printing

• Offset lithography in up to twelve colours. It took four months to print the facsimile. During this entire time, Linda Falter was at the press ensuring, before allowing printing to proceed, that the colour reproduction of every page perfectly matched the proofs and that no hickeys or marks had crept onto the plates.

Folio 214b - Detail from the Yozer for Shabbat Bereishit <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

Gilding & Application of Silver Leaf

• The three different types of gold found in the manuscript have all been faithfully copied in the facsimile. The raised burnished gold of the original has been reproduced by applying metal leaf to a built-up surface (replicating the original’s gesso) exactly where the leaf is raised in the original manuscript. Flat gold was reproduced by applying a metal leaf by hand. Gold powder was applied to all the illustrations that contain it in the original.
• Silver metal leaf was applied by hand wherever it appeared in the original and wherever the silver had oxidised, a darker leaf and special varnish was used to accurately portray the oxidation.

Pricking & Cutting

• The scribe’s pricking holes on each folio were reproduced for the first time ever in a facsimile.
• Once printed each page was cut to the exact size and shape of the original and then aged at the edges. No previously published facsimile has achieved this level of precision and accuracy.

Binding

• Fine morocco goatskin is blind-tooled on both covers and the spine. The book block is sewn over hand-made head and tail bands. Four oxidised sterling silver clasps are attached by leather thongs to silver catch-plates which are themselves attached by tiny silver nails.

 

Commentary Volume

• 256 pages (46 in colour) printed on mould-made cold-pressed Magnani 160gsm paper. The commentary volume is bound in blind-tooled morocco goatskin and presented in a cloth covered slip-case to compliment the facsimile.

Presentation

• The facsimile and commentary are individually housed in hand made slip-cases. The slip case for the facsimile has been specially constructed to accommodate the clasps.

Gift Certificate

• Each facsimile can be personally dedicated at no extra charge. Whether the facsimile is intended as a gift to an institution or a private individual, our calligrapher can inscribe a beautiful illuminated gift certificate.

Edition

• Strictly limited to 500 numbered and 50 Ad Personam copies. Each volume. discreetly numbered by hand on the inside back cover using minute steel dies, is accompanied by a numbered and signed certificate carrying the seal of the Israel Museum.
• On completion of the edition the printing plates were destroyed to protect the significant investment value of each facsimile.

Shipping & Insurance

• Price includes robust protective packaging, worldwide courier delivery (frequently overnight) and insurance at no extra charge.

Folio 44b - The ending of the Book of Psalms and King David. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>
Folio 44b - The ending of the Book of Psalms and King David. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

Commentary Volume

• 256 pages (46 in colour) printed on mould-made cold-pressed Magnani 160gsm paper. The commentary volume is bound in blind-tooled morocco goatskin and presented in a cloth covered slip-case to compliment the facsimile.

Presentation

• The facsimile and commentary are individually housed in hand made slip-cases. The slip case for the facsimile has been specially constructed to accommodate the clasps.

Gift Certificate

• Each facsimile can be personally dedicated at no extra charge. Whether the facsimile is intended as a gift to an institution or a private individual, our calligrapher can inscribe a beautiful illuminated gift certificate.

Edition

• Strictly limited to 500 numbered and 50 Ad Personam copies. Each volume. discreetly numbered by hand on the inside back cover using minute steel dies, is accompanied by a numbered and signed certificate carrying the seal of the Israel Museum.
• On completion of the edition the printing plates were destroyed to protect the significant investment value of each facsimile.

Shipping & Insurance

• Price includes robust protective packaging, worldwide courier delivery (frequently overnight) and insurance at no extra charge.

Folio 64b Depicting Job and his seven sons and three daughter, ‘Nowhere in the land were women as beautiful as Job’s daughters to be found…’.  Folio 65a The Lord gave Job twice what he had before. ‘God gave to Job a foretaste of the bliss of paradise…’ <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

The Contents of the Rothschild Miscellany

The contents of the Rothschild Miscellany encompasses the religious beliefs and facsinating secular interests of an educated, Renaissence person. The following comprehensive table of contents was prepared by Binyamin Elizur in Jerusalem. A Hebrew/English version may be downloaded here and his research into the dating of the manuscript may be downloaded here. In the following index, marginal text is highlighted in blue.

Rothschild Miscellany folio 1b - King David the musician, at the beginning of the Book of Psalms <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

1b        Psalms   Rashi’s commentary to Psalms

40a      List of Psalms

41a      Contents of Tashbez (on margins of pp. 79-123)

44a      Contents of Hayyey Olam (on margins of pp. 124-133)

45b      Job   Rashi’s commentary to Job up to 42,3

63a      R. Jacob Nazir’s commentary on Job 40,25-41,26

65b      Proverbs   Rashi’s commentary to Proverbs

79b      Daily Shaharit (Morning Service)   R. Shimshon b. Zadok – Tashbez

99a      Daily & Sabbath Arvit (Evening Service)

101a    Bamme Madliqin (Tractate Shabbat chapter II)

103a    Sabbath Shaharit (Nishmat)

108b    Sabbath Musaf (Additional Service)

110a    Sabbath Minha (Afternoon Service)

Folio 45b - The beginning of the Book of Job possibly depicting “God gave to Job a foretaste of the bliss of paradise”. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

110b    Saturday night Arvit

111b    New Moon Musaf

112a    Sabbath & New Moon Musaf

113a    Anenu on fast days; Nahem on the Ninth of Ab

113b    Al Hanissim on Hanukkah & Purim

114a    Megilla Benedictions

115a    Festivals Shaharit & Musaf

117b    Watodienu for Festivals on Saturday night

118a    Bettering a bad dream

118b    Berit Mila (Circumcision)

119a    Grace after Meals for Circumcision

120a    Harahaman (Grace after Meals Hymn) for Circumcision

120b    Wedding Benedictions

121b    Burial Service (Ziduq Hadin)

Folio 79b - The beginning of the prayer book begins with Ma tovu. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

122b    Grace after Meals for a Mourner

123a    Eruv Tavshilin (Amalgamation of Dishes)

123b    Eruv Hazerot (Amalgamation of Courts)

124a    Rules of Various Blessings   R. Yonah Gerondi – Hayyey ‘Olam (Eternal Life)

125b    Grace after Eating

127a    Travelling Prayer; Havinenu (shortened prayer)

127b    11 Verses beginning and finishing with nun

128a    Pitum Haqetoret (Compound forming the Incense)

128b    72 Verses and the Names coming out of them

130b    New Moon Blessing

131a    Qiddush for Festivals

132a    Service for Rosh Hashana (New Year)

133b    R. Samuel – Minhagim (Customs)

Folio 113b - The Al Ha Nissim prayer of thanksgiving, “For the miracles and the redemption”, recited at Hanukkah. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

134b    Musaf for Rosh Hashana

138a    Avinu Malkenu (‘Our Father, Our King’ – Litany)

139a    Viduy for Yom Kippur (Confession on the Day of Atonement)

140b    Service for Yom Kippur

142a    Musaf for Yom Kippur

143a    Ne’ilah (concluding prayer) for Yom Kippur

147a    Hosha’anot for Sukkot (Appeal to God for Deliverance on the Feast of Tabernacles)

149b    Hosha’anot for Hosha’ana Rabba (7th Day of Sukkot)

155b    Haggadah shel Pesah (Passover Haggadah)   Maimonides’ Passover Laws

166b    Pirqey Avot (Sayings of the Fathers)   Maimonides’ commentary to Chapter Heleq

174b    Maimonides’ Eight Chapters (preface to Tractate Avot)   Abraham Ibn Daud – Book of Tradition

Folio 120b - The marriage ceremony is accompanied by the words, “Behold you are consecrated to me by this ring according to the law of Moses and of Israel.” <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

185a    Maimonides’ commentary on Tractate Avot

190a    Isaac Israeli – excerpt from Yesod ‘olam

191a    Maimonides’ Biography by Solomon b. Yihyun

191b    R. Joseph Ibn ‘Aqnin – Introduction to the Talmud

199a    Ma’ariv (evening prayer Hymn) for the 1st night of Pesah

199b    R. J. Ibn ‘Aqnin – Treatise on Weights & Measures

200b    Ma’ariv for the 2nd night of Pesah

202b    Ma’ariv for the 7th night of Pesah   Musar ‘Ali ben Sina (Aristotelian)

204a    Ma’ariv for the 8th night of Pesah

205b    Ma’ariv for the 1st night of Shavu’ot (Pentecost)

206a    Josippon (Medieval pseudo-Josephus)

206b    Ma’ariv for the 2nd night of Shavu’ot

Folio 127a - The Traveller’s Prayer, Tefillat ha’Derech. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

209b    Ma’ariv for the 1st night of Sukkot (Tabernacles)

210a    Ma’ariv for the 2nd night of Sukkot

212a    Ma’ariv for the 8th night of Sukkot (Shmini ‘Azeret)

213b    Ma’ariv for the last night of Sukkot (Simhat Torah)

214b    Yozer for Sabbath Bereshit (morning prayer Hymn on Sabbath after Simhat Torah)

217a    Yozer for Sabbath Hanukkah

220a    Yozer for the 2nd Sabbath Hanukkah

222b    Yozer for the 1st intermission (between Shqalim & Zakhor)

223b    Yozer for the 2nd intermission (between Zakhor & Para)

225b    Zulat for the 1st Sabbath after New Moon of Iyyar

226a    Zulat for the 2nd Sabbath after New Moon of Iyyar

226b    Zulat for the 3rd Sabbath after New Moon of Iyyar

Folio 166b - The end of the Haggadah, “Next year in Jerusalem”. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

227a    Zulat (middle of Shema blessigs Hymn) for Portion Behar

228a    Yozer for the Sabbath before Shavu’ot

229b    Zulat for the 1st Sabbath after 17th of Tamuz

230a    Zulat for the 2nd Sabbath after 17th of Tamuz

231a    Yozer for Sabbath Nahamu (the Sabbath after the 9th of Ab)

233a    Yozer for Sabbath Shuva (the Sabbath between New Year & the Day of Atonement)

235a    Yozer for the Intermediate Sabbath of Sukkot

236b    Yozer for Simhat Torah

238b    Taking out the Scrolls of the Law for Simhat Torah

239b    Reshut for Hatan Torah (Permission Hymn for the Valedictorian of the Torah)

240a    Reshut for Hatan Bereshit

240b    Hymns for Simhat Torah

Folio 90a - The crossing of the Red Sea. As the Israelites cross on dry land, Pharaoh drowns dressed in a suit of golden armour. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

241b    Yozer for Sabbath & New Moon

243b    Yozer for Sabbath & Circumcision

246a    Yozer for Sabbath & Marriage

248b    Reshut & Hymns for Hatan (Bridegroom)

251a    Selihoth for the fast of the 1st Monday

256b    Selihoth for the fast of Thursday

259a    Selihoth for the fast of the 2nd Monday

262a    Selihoth for the fast of the 10th of Tebeth

265b    Selihoth for the fast of the 17th of Tamuz

269a    Selihoth for Ta’anit Esther (Esther’s Fast -13th of Adar)

272a    Reading the Law & the Haftarah for Fasts

273b    Shir Hakavod (Hymn of Praise)

Folio 246a - Detail illuminating Yozer for Sabbath and marriage <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

275a    Josippon (continuation)

298a    R. Shem-Tov Ibn Phalaquera – Book of Degrees

298b    Isaac Ibn Sahula – Proverb of the Ancients

334b    Chronicles of Moses

341b    Midrash va-Yissa’u (The Wars of the Sons of Jacob)

343a    The Story of Hiram King of Tyre

343b    Maimonides’ Letter to Lunel Scholars on Astrology

347a    Yeda’ayah ha-Penini – Examination of the World

357b    Apologia – Y. ha-Penini to R. Solomon Adret

372b    The Prince and the Hermit (Abraham Ibn Hasdai – translator)

382a    Judah Ibn Shabtai – Tribute of Judah the Misogynist

393b    R. Issac b. Meir of Duren – Gates of Dura

418b    Secret of Secrets (Pseudo Aristotle)

Folio 273b - Shir Hakavod (Song of Glory). Two winged golden angels hold a scroll. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

433b    Isaac Ibn Hunayn – Apothegms of the Philosophers

440a    Decisions of R. Isaac of Corbeil

445b    Enactments of R. Gershom ‘Light of the Exile’

447b    Testament of R. Judah ‘the Pious’

449a    Differences between Palestinian & Babylonian  Jews

450a    Mishpat Hibbut ha-Kever (Beating of the Grave)

451a    Alphabet of Ben Sira (Pseudo Ben-Sira)

455a    Collection of Rabbinic Sayings (by numbers 3-10)

458b    Death of Alexander the Great

463a    Rules for determination of the calendar

464b    Joseph ha-Ezovi (of Perpignan) – Silver Bowl

467b    Judah Halevi – Poem for Sabbath Zakhor (before Purim)

469b    Judah Halevi – Poem for Pesah

Folio 418b - Sefer Sod Hasodot, the Book of the Secret of Secrets. <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

471a    Determination calendar of cycles 271-283 (1371-1617) [the calendar only until cycle 279 (until 1541)]

471b    Solar cycle (28 years)

472a    Lunar cycle (cycle 276)

473a    Table of contents

Fol 472a Calendar decorated with rabbits and flowers <small><a href="https://www.facsimile-editions.com/copyright/">© Copyright 2020 Facsimile Editions Ltd</a></small>

The Rothschild Miscellany Facsimile

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